Program: “Farocki Now: A Temporary Academy”, October 18-21, 2017, HKW & silent green, Berlin


(c) Harun Farocki GbR, Parallel II (still), 2014

 

In the fall of 2017 the Harun Farocki Retrospective will be held in Berlin. The two exhibitions in the Neuen Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) and at Savvy Contemporary open on September 13, and on September 15 a comprehensive program begins in Arsenal with all the films and TV work.

Within the framework of the five month retrospective we will be establishing an educational-performative platform at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) and the silent green Kulturquartier from October 18 to 21, 2017. On four days “Farocki Now: A Temporary Academy” will serve as a forum for workshops, presentations, and debates which explore the contemporary relevance of Harun Farocki’s work and thought, placing it in new contexts and activating its productive potential. Six study groups from art schools, universities and self-organized institutes from Alexandria, Berlin, Jakarta, Philadelphia, and Potsdam will present their months-long research extending from Farocki’s work.

For the opening of the Temporary Academy on October 18, HaFI and HKW host “Accessing Images,” a discursive evening on the accessibility and availability of images in contemporary visual cultures marked by high performance algorithms, ramified data structures, political claims to power and rigid legal frameworks. Taking its cue from Farocki’s labor with and in images, “Accessing Images” aims at debating the outlines of a visual pedagogy capable of facing the challenge of an increasing autonomy of “operational images” (Farocki) and the impending loss of visual agency.

The academy will be held in English.
Free entry.

 

Wednesday 18.10.
Haus der Kulturen der Welt

7 p.m. Accessing Images
Welcoming address from Anselm Franke (HKW)
Introduction to the evening by Tom Holert, Doreen Mende, and Volker Pantenburg (HaFI)

7.30 p.m. Lectures and discussions, moderated by Sven Lütticken
Misguided Eyes by Natascha Sadr Haghighian
The Problem of the Negro for Cinematography by Kodwo Eshun

8.15 p.m. Break

8.30 p.m. Lectures and discussions, moderated by Sven Lütticken
Visualizing Surveillance by Laura Mulvey
Planetary Processing by Susan Schuppli

9.15 p.m. Concluding discussion with Sven Lütticken in conversation with all the speakers.

 

Thursday 19.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Building Blocks
Project from the Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin – DFFB students
With Michael Baute, Vivien Kristin Buchhorn, Julia Katharina Milz, and Ewelina Aleksandra Rosinska

2.30 p.m. – 5.30 p.m. Reality would have to begin. Speaking about Farocki
An ongoing curated discussion with MASS Alexandria/Egypt
With Asmaa Barakat, Marianne Fahmy, Assem A. Hendawi, Ash Moniz, Nadia Mounier (from afar), and Nardeen Nabil, moderated by Berit Schuck and Bassam El Baroni with Sandra Schäfer as invited guest

7.30 p.m. Navigation
Round table discussion with members of the Harun Farocki Institut and Sven Lütticken

 

Friday 20.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. PiL (Politicizing image Ltd.)
Projects from members of the Institut ruangrupa, Forum Lenteng, OK.Video, Lab Laba-Laba, and 69 Performance Club, Jakarta/Indonesia
With farid rakun (Institut ruangrupa), Abi Rama (Forum Lenteng/69 Performance Club, from afar), Raslene (Lab Laba-Laba), and Anggraeni Dwi Widhiasih (Koperasi Riset Purusha/Forum Lenteng)

2.30 p.m. – 5.30 p.m. Against
Projects from the European Media Studies program of the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam/University Potsdam
With Jan Distelmeyer, Pune Djalilehvand, Daniel Franz, Morgana Karch, Victoria Kuo, Daniel Paschen, Judith Pietreck, and Endi Tupja

7.30 p.m. Borders: After Farocki / Ehmann’s Labour in a Single Shot
Project from the Temple University Film & Media Arts MFA Program, Philadelphia/USA
With Peter d’Agostino, Nora M. Alter, Madeleine Bishop, Jonas Denzel, Sarah Drury, Samantha Heth, Gabriella Gungon Lopez, Althea Mengxi Rao, and Sonali Udaybabu

 

Saturday 21.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. LARP: Brand New Island
Live Action Role Play with students of the Lensbased Class of the Berlin University of the Arts
With Viktor Bone, Josh Crowle, Charlotte Eifler, Giorgi Gago Gagoshidze, Tania Ilishenko, Jonathan Jung, Laura Katzauer, Peter Kirk, Adrian Knuppertz, Can Kurucu, Magdalena Mitterhofer, Bruno Siegrist, Soma Sohrabi, Hito Steyerl, Mizu Sugai, Mario Udzenija, and Andres Villarreal

—> The event is for registered participants only, who are willing to play an active role in the game. Attendance to the LARP for registered audience only. For registration, please contact: gio.gago@gmail.com
More information here.

2.30 p.m. Desktop Intervention
By Kevin B. Lee(Paris)

 

The handout is available as pdf here.

 

Adresses:
Haus der Kulturen der Welt
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin

silent green
Gerichtstraße 35
13347 Berlin

* The Harun Farocki Retrospective is a project of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) in cooperation with the Arsenal Institute for Film and Video Art, the Harun Farocki Institut, the Harun Farocki GbR, the silent green Kulturquartier, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Savvy Contemporary, and Haus der Kulturen der Welt within the framework of the Berlin Art Week and is sponsored by the Senate Department for Culture and Europe. The Farocki Now Academy is supported by: Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin, European Media Studies – University of Applied Sciences Potsdam/Potsdam University, Goethe-Institut, Gudang Sarinah Ekosistem, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen, MASS Alexandria, Mophradat, and Temple University’s Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts.

September 18th, 2017 — Projects / Event
Interface

Some basics from the Strike MoMA site: “Campaigns, actions, and letters chip away at the regime’s facade from the outside. Inside, every time workers organize, defy the boss, care for a coworker, disrespect secrecy, or enact other forms of subversion, cracks are created in the core. Cracking and chipping, chipping and cracking. As the walls that artificially separate the museum from the world collapse, we reorient away from the institution and come together to make plans. Let us strike in all the ways possible to exit from the terms of the museum so we can set our own.”

 

via Hyperallergic on the environmental impact of blockchain referring to recent NFT (non-fungible token) art sales: “This is not the first time the art world has come under scrutiny for being on the wrong side of the climate conversation. Artists and activists have protested everything from the carbon footprint of physical art fairs to the fossil fuel money funding major museums. But some say the energy consumption of cryptocurrencies is particularly egregious, and research shows it’s relatively easily quantifiable. A study by Cambridge University, for instance, estimates that bitcoin uses more electricity per year than the entire nation of Argentina. (Ethereum mining consumes a quarter to half of what Bitcoin mining does, but one transaction uses more power than an average US household in a day, according to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.)”

 

Nicholas Mirzoeff on “Artificial vision, white space and racial surveillance capitalism”: “Based as it is on ‘epidermalization’ (the assertion of absolute difference based on relative differences in skin color), AI’s racial surveillance deploys an all-too-familiar racialized way of seeing operating at plan-etary scale. It is the plantation future we are now living in. All such operations take place in and via the new imagined white space of technology known as the cloud. In reality, a very material arrangement of servers and cables, the cloud is both an engine of high-return low-employment capitalism and one of the prime drivers of carbon emissions.”

 

Sara Ahmed on the performativity of disgust (from The Cultural Politics of Emotion, 2004): “To name something as disgusting is to transfer the stickiness of the word ‘disgust’ to an object, which henceforth becomes generated as the very thing that is spoken. The relationship between the stickiness of the sign and the stickiness of the object is crucial to the performativity of disgust as well as the apparent resistance of disgust reactions to ‘newness’ in terms of the generation of different kinds of objects. The object that is generated as a disgusting (bad) object through the speech act comes to stick. It becomes sticky and acquires a fetish quality, which then engenders its own effects.”

November 7th, 2020

David Graeber (1961-2020) on What Would It Take (from his The Democracy Project. A History, a Crisis, a Movement, 2013, p. 193): “We have little idea what sort of organizations, or for that matter, technologies, would emerge if free people were unfettered to use their imagination to actually solve collective problems rather than to make them worse. But the primary question is: how do we even get there? What would it take to allow our political and economic systems to become a mode of collective problem solving rather than, as they are now, a mode of collective war?”

September 7th, 2020

T.J. Demos on why cultural practitioners should never surrender, via tranzit.sk:  “For artists, writers, and curators, as art historians and teachers, the meaning-production of an artwork is never finished, never fully appropriated and coopted, in my view, and we should never surrender it; the battle over significance is ongoing. We see that battle rise up in relation to racist and colonial monuments these days in the US, the UK, and South Africa. While the destruction of such monuments results from and is enabling of radical politics, it’s still not enough until the larger institutions that support and maintain their existence as well as the continuation of the politics they represent are also torn down. This is urgent as well in the cultural sphere, including the arts institutions, universities, art markets, discursive sphere of magazines and journals, all in thrall to neoliberalism, where we must recognize that it’s ultimately inadequate to simply inject critical or radical content into these frameworks, which we know excel at incorporating those anti-extractivist expressions into further forms of cultural capital and wealth accumulation. What’s required is more of the building of nonprofit and community-based institutions, organizing radical political horizons and solidarity between social formations.”

August 21st, 2020
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