Program: “Farocki Now: A Temporary Academy”, October 18-21, 2017, HKW & silent green, Berlin


(c) Harun Farocki GbR, Parallel II (still), 2014

 

In the fall of 2017 the Harun Farocki Retrospective will be held in Berlin. The two exhibitions in the Neuen Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) and at Savvy Contemporary open on September 13, and on September 15 a comprehensive program begins in Arsenal with all the films and TV work.

Within the framework of the five month retrospective we will be establishing an educational-performative platform at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) and the silent green Kulturquartier from October 18 to 21, 2017. On four days “Farocki Now: A Temporary Academy” will serve as a forum for workshops, presentations, and debates which explore the contemporary relevance of Harun Farocki’s work and thought, placing it in new contexts and activating its productive potential. Six study groups from art schools, universities and self-organized institutes from Alexandria, Berlin, Jakarta, Philadelphia, and Potsdam will present their months-long research extending from Farocki’s work.

For the opening of the Temporary Academy on October 18, HaFI and HKW host “Accessing Images,” a discursive evening on the accessibility and availability of images in contemporary visual cultures marked by high performance algorithms, ramified data structures, political claims to power and rigid legal frameworks. Taking its cue from Farocki’s labor with and in images, “Accessing Images” aims at debating the outlines of a visual pedagogy capable of facing the challenge of an increasing autonomy of “operational images” (Farocki) and the impending loss of visual agency.

The academy will be held in English.
Free entry.

 

Wednesday 18.10.
Haus der Kulturen der Welt

7 p.m. Accessing Images
Welcoming address from Anselm Franke (HKW)
Introduction to the evening by Tom Holert, Doreen Mende, and Volker Pantenburg (HaFI)

7.30 p.m. Lectures and discussions, moderated by Sven Lütticken
Misguided Eyes by Natascha Sadr Haghighian
The Problem of the Negro for Cinematography by Kodwo Eshun

8.15 p.m. Break

8.30 p.m. Lectures and discussions, moderated by Sven Lütticken
Visualizing Surveillance by Laura Mulvey
Planetary Processing by Susan Schuppli

9.15 p.m. Concluding discussion with Sven Lütticken in conversation with all the speakers.

 

Thursday 19.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Building Blocks
Project from the Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin – DFFB students
With Michael Baute, Vivien Kristin Buchhorn, Julia Katharina Milz, and Ewelina Aleksandra Rosinska

2.30 p.m. – 5.30 p.m. Reality would have to begin. Speaking about Farocki
An ongoing curated discussion with MASS Alexandria/Egypt
With Asmaa Barakat, Marianne Fahmy, Assem A. Hendawi, Ash Moniz, Nadia Mounier (from afar), and Nardeen Nabil, moderated by Berit Schuck and Bassam El Baroni with Sandra Schäfer as invited guest

7.30 p.m. Navigation
Round table discussion with members of the Harun Farocki Institut and Sven Lütticken

 

Friday 20.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. PiL (Politicizing image Ltd.)
Projects from members of the Institut ruangrupa, Forum Lenteng, OK.Video, Lab Laba-Laba, and 69 Performance Club, Jakarta/Indonesia
With farid rakun (Institut ruangrupa), Abi Rama (Forum Lenteng/69 Performance Club, from afar), Raslene (Lab Laba-Laba), and Anggraeni Dwi Widhiasih (Koperasi Riset Purusha/Forum Lenteng)

2.30 p.m. – 5.30 p.m. Against
Projects from the European Media Studies program of the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam/University Potsdam
With Jan Distelmeyer, Pune Djalilehvand, Daniel Franz, Morgana Karch, Victoria Kuo, Daniel Paschen, Judith Pietreck, and Endi Tupja

7.30 p.m. Borders: After Farocki / Ehmann’s Labour in a Single Shot
Project from the Temple University Film & Media Arts MFA Program, Philadelphia/USA
With Peter d’Agostino, Nora M. Alter, Madeleine Bishop, Jonas Denzel, Sarah Drury, Samantha Heth, Gabriella Gungon Lopez, Althea Mengxi Rao, and Sonali Udaybabu

 

Saturday 21.10.
silent green

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. LARP: Brand New Island
Live Action Role Play with students of the Lensbased Class of the Berlin University of the Arts
With Viktor Bone, Josh Crowle, Charlotte Eifler, Giorgi Gago Gagoshidze, Tania Ilishenko, Jonathan Jung, Laura Katzauer, Peter Kirk, Adrian Knuppertz, Can Kurucu, Magdalena Mitterhofer, Bruno Siegrist, Soma Sohrabi, Hito Steyerl, Mizu Sugai, Mario Udzenija, and Andres Villarreal

—> The event is for registered participants only, who are willing to play an active role in the game. Attendance to the LARP for registered audience only. For registration, please contact: gio.gago@gmail.com
More information here.

2.30 p.m. Desktop Intervention
By Kevin B. Lee(Paris)

 

The handout is available as pdf here.

 

Adresses:
Haus der Kulturen der Welt
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin

silent green
Gerichtstraße 35
13347 Berlin

* The Harun Farocki Retrospective is a project of the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) in cooperation with the Arsenal Institute for Film and Video Art, the Harun Farocki Institut, the Harun Farocki GbR, the silent green Kulturquartier, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Savvy Contemporary, and Haus der Kulturen der Welt within the framework of the Berlin Art Week and is sponsored by the Senate Department for Culture and Europe. The Farocki Now Academy is supported by: Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin, European Media Studies – University of Applied Sciences Potsdam/Potsdam University, Goethe-Institut, Gudang Sarinah Ekosistem, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen, MASS Alexandria, Mophradat, and Temple University’s Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts.

September 18th, 2017 — Projects / Event
Interface

The Reconstruction of Ukraine. Ruination / Representation / Solidarity, online symposium, September 9-11, 2022. “The Reconstruction of Ukraine: Ruination / Representation / Solidarity” devotes particular attention to cities, architecture, art, culture and psychological trauma – but the scope of the conversations it aims to start is broader. In due course, the discussions held during the symposium may coalesce into myriad projects, initiatives and experiments undertaken by government institutions, municipalities, educational and cultural bodies and other more interstitial actors. The ambition of this symposium is to establish a platform for dialogue, facilitating communication, collaboration and constructive argument between diverse actors and initiatives.

George Edwards (Zetkin Collective) on war, nationalism and the “anti-climate lobby” (via Arts of the Working Class): “The latest prognosis of this particular war was spelt out in a flurry of reports from the IPCC; the most recent, described as ‘an atlas of human suffering’ by the chief of the UN, demanded ‘rapid, deep and immediate’ emissions cuts in all sectors to ensure an inhabitable planet for all. In step with the science, many wish this conflict to mark the beginning of an intensified programme of decarbonization, ridding economies of not only Russian, but all fossil fuels, wherever their geological source. But whilst political leaders scramble abroad to secure new sources of fossil fuels – sweet-talking sheiks and summoning LNG terminals from the ground – a resourceful and committed cohort, let’s call them the anti-climate lobby, refuse to accept this diagnosis. The partakers in the fossil industry have seized upon this crisis, sensing it as an opportunity to enlarge and entrench economic interests rooted in fossil fuels. As the course of action prescribed by the IPCC imperils this line of business, the attempts to secure fresh investments in fossil fuel infrastructures, to lock-in production and secure profits for the coming decades may feel all the more pressing. The solutions they pose also fit within the national frame and it is with nationalist political forces that they find their most ardent allies.”

July 31st, 2022

The fundamental difference that we face in Europe at the moment between the Western approach characterized by the pursuit of peace and the Eastern one focused on liberation and independence poses a dramatic challenge – in order to survive and progress, democracy as a political regime has to be capable of defending itself also in a military way.” Armed Democracy revolves around the concepts of imperialism, liberation, fascism, autocracy, revolution, and militarization in pursuit of the world to come on Europe’s burnt out land. Conceived by the Kyiv Biennial and Biennale Warszawa from the East Europe Biennial Alliance, this special public program, curated by Vasyl Cherepanyn within the 2nd edition of Biennale Warszawa, the program is a first part of the series organized by the East Europe Biennial Alliance discussing Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine and taking place in Warsaw, Prague, Kassel, and Riga over the summer and fall of 2022.

Olena Lyubchenko on Whiteness, Expropriation, War, and Social Reproduction in Ukraine (via LeftEast): “[…] when we hear on the news that ‘Ukraine is fighting a European war’ and ‘Ukraine is defending Europe’, amid images of fleeing ‘poor white’ women with children prioritized over racialized ‘Others’, ‘Ukraine’ is being made ‘white’ in the global imaginary. That is, “the injunction to ‘return to Europe’ by way of Europeanization is enabled and conditioned on the mythologies of Western civilization, and that Europeanization at once marks (promulgates) and unmarks (naturalizes) racial whiteness” [Nadezhda Husakouskaya and Randi Gressgård]. The paradox is that Europe’s existence as such has only been possible precisely because of the exploitation of global working peoples through expropriation of resources and today neoliberal economic reforms and reproduced by feminized labour.”

Vasyl Cherepanyn about the “inertness, hiding behind the European Wall” (via L’Internationale): “Many Western institutions that have been claiming ‘radical political engagement’ for years, have simply resorted to a white cube radicalism and self-satisfying humanitarianism, too afraid of acting politically beyond their comfort zone and unsettling their publics and authorities by attempting to affect the decision-making process regarding the Ukrainian cause.”

May 28th, 2022

Tatsiana Shchurko on the War in Ukraine, Entangled Imperialisms, and Transnational Feminist Solidarity, via LeftEast (May 2, 2022): “[An] uneven knowledge production and the many implications of the war against Ukraine reveal the dire need to develop a feminist anti-capitalist critique of multiple imperialisms. This language should grow from within the occupied and suppressed communities of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. An anti-imperialist and anti-capitalist feminist positionality grasps that the local is part of a global in an effort to build transnational connections of mutual aid and support against state and corporate violence. For example, statements of solidarity with Ukraine expressed by the International Committee of Indigenous Peoples of Russia and Native American communities along with the anti-war feminist march in Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan) on March 8, 2022, pointing out that the war in Ukraine should be of concern for a broad transnational community, may serve as instrumental examples of alternative anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist solidarities that stretch beyond state regulations and macro-politics and foreground decolonial perspectives, necessary in addressing entanglements of multiple imperialisms. Such solidarities also bring to light hidden interconnections of the past that allowed for distant communities to survive and support each other against the violence of imperialist intervention and its attendant capitalist exploitation. Thus, the march in Bishkek reminds of the socialist roots of the International Women’s Day to call for internationalist, intersectional, class solidarity against imperialism and militarism.”

Vasyl Cherepanyn on that “It’ll take more than tanks to ease Germany’s guilt” (via Politico): “Since the Soviet Union’s collapse, Germany has been imposing neocolonial optics on its Eastern European ‘peripheries,’ and on the post-Soviet space in particular, where Ukraine was long considered a gray buffer zone about which the EU was ‘deeply concerned.’ Germany didn’t bother itself much with differentiating between former Soviet countries’ pasts. Even until recently, any Ukrainian agenda in Germany was often ‘balanced’ with a Russian perspective, so as to not exclude the latter by any means.”

An unnamed anarchist and art scholar, who joined the Territorial Defense Forces, quoted by Olexii Kuchanskyi in an essay on “Digital Leviathan and His Nuclear Tail” (via Your Art and e-flux notes): “At dawn, Dima and I talked about cinema. Dima believes that cinema is inferior to literature as a means of expression because you spend much more time with a book than a film. It’s a really interesting point, something to dig into. I studied at the department of art theory & history and I never thought of it. Dima served in the military after school and worked at the factory all his life. He listens to rap, smokes pot, and tries to have fun. He is thirty-eight, his child was born last year. He likes Wong Kar-wai and is a fan of Asian cinema in general. Dima communicates by quoting Omar Khayyam, Confucius, and other awesome guys.”

April 20th, 2022
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