Public protest in the age of Covid-19 (Journal of Visual Culture & HaFI, 10)

This is the tenth instalment of a collaborative effort by the Journal of Visual Culture and the Harun Farocki Institut, initiated by the COVID-19 crisis. The call sent to JVC’s editorial board, and a wide selection of previous contributors and members of its extended communities, described the task as follows: “There is a lot of spontaneous, ad hoc opinion-making and premature commentary around, as to be expected. However, the ethics and politics of artistic and theoretical practice to be pursued in this situation should oblige us to stay cautious and to intervene with care in the discussion. As one of JVC’s editors, Brooke Belisle, explains: ‘We are not looking for sensationalism, but rather, moments of reflection that: make connections between what’s happening now and the larger intellectual contexts that our readership shares; offer small ways to be reflective and to draw on tools we have and things we know instead of just feeling numb and overwhelmed; help serve as intellectual community for one another while we are isolated; support the work of being thoughtful and trying to find/make meaning…which is always a collective endeavour, even if we are forced to be apart.'” TH

 

Public protest in the Age of Covid19

Kasia Bojarska

 

Was April the cruelest of the months of lockdown?

I see my dry hands, clean as hell, as never before. And I see fear in a handful of sanitizer.

First, we got socially immobilized, publicly absent, forcefully attached to our households. In Poland, leaving one’s home was only legal if one was heading to work or to satisfy the necessities of everyday life.

A crisis like this one hits the weakest and it seems at its core it means ‘a disaster to feminism’. Five weeks into the crisis Polish parliament decided to proceed a citizens’ bill to make even more stringent what has already been one of the most restrictive abortion laws in Europe. Ironically, while coronavirus seems to affect women less severely, the alt-right will try to re-claim its share.

 

left: Warsaw-Praga, line to Pewex, Aleksander Jałosiński/Forum
right: Warsaw, 3.10.2016, Black Monday, Chris Niedenthal (Archiwum Prostestów Publicznych)

 

The first thesis of the recently published manifesto, Feminism for the 99%, bespeaks the reinvention of the strike which took place in October 2016 in Poland, ‘when more than 100,000 women staged walkouts and marches to oppose the country’s ban on abortion.’[1] Yet it was not even 4 years later, when women under lockdown had to reinvent the strike again.

How to protest in the times of coronavirus, how not to surrender at the times of utmost confusion and fragility?

Amidst the health care crisis, we had to manifest exceptional self-care and solidarity without being able to take to the streets.

In this state of exception, measures were taken spontaneously and collectively, and beside online campaigning, we did go out, nevertheless. People began to form lines – keeping the prescribed distance – in front of grocery stores, waiting to satisfy their basic needs. This has been powerfully and ironically resonant of queuing in socialist times: hopeless and frequently fruitless everyday practice which was not teaching people – as some wish to believe – solidarity as much as it was exercising their despair and humiliation, especially in the 1980s, the first decade of my life.

 

left: Warsaw, 15.04.2020, Agata Siwiak
right: East News, Karol Malcuzynski

The queue I remember best, however, was an exceptional one on a spring day in 1986 when among a mass of people, we waited the get lifesaving Lugol’s iodine supposedly a protection against radioactivity flowing from Chernobyl. Another invisible threat, a concealed killer.

Is April the cruelest month mixing memory and militancy?

 

Warsaw, 15.04.2020, Jasza Strongin

 

[1] Cinzia ArruzzaTithi Bhattacharya, and Nancy Fraser, Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto, London: Verso, 2019.
Kasia Bojarska, Warsaw, Poland
May 2nd, 2020, 02 / Rosa Mercedes
Interface

Paul B. Preciado on Indigenous models for “stopping the world,” via Artforum: “Every culture has invented procedures for isolation, for fasting, for breaking the rhythms of eating, sexual activity, and production. Those caesuras serve as techniques for modifying subjectivity, activating a process that disrupts perception and feeling and can ultimately generate a transformation, a new way of becoming. Certain languages of Indigenous shamanism call this process ‘stopping the world.’ And that is literally what happened during the Covid-19 crisis. The capitalist mode briefly stopped. […] we could say (drawing on the Brazilian anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro’s analysis of Tupi rituals and shamanic practices) that they usually include at least three stages. In the first, the subject is confronted with their mortality; in the second, they see their position in the trophic chain and perceive the energetic connections that unite all living things; in the final stage, they radically modify their desire, which will perhaps allow them to transform, to become someone else.”

July 26th, 2020, Tom

On the occasion of the film festival “Reconstructing Realities,” the Broadway Cinematheque in Hong Kong will show the film “How to live in FRG” (1990) from Harun Farocki.
The screening will take place on Saturday, July 11, 2:30 pm (local time) at the Goethe Institut Hong Kong.
Online booklet: https://bit.ly/bcXForum50

Reconstructing Realities – A Film Programme to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Berlinale Forum

The screening will be followed by the talk “Harun Farocki’s Imitations of Life” with Doreen Mende, co-founder of the Harun Farocki Institut.
Time: Jul 11, 2020 04:00 pm Hong Kong SAR / 10:00 am Berlin time
Language: English

The talk will be held on Zoom, registration here: https://forms.gle/tyLfKLwBYNUutoLz6
After registration, you will receive an email with the link and the login information to join the talk.

https://www.goethe.de/ins/cn/de/sta/hon/ver.cfm?fuseaction=events.detail&event_id=21884136&

July 8th, 2020, HaFI

Avery F. Gordon, in an interview conducted by Katherine Hite and Daniela Jara in Memory Studies:  “Non-participation is one modality of what I call being in-difference. Being in-difference is a political consciousness and a sensuous knowledge, a standpoint and a mindset for living on better terms than we’re offered, for living as if you had the necessity and the freedom to do so, for living in the acknowledgement that, despite the overwhelming power of all the systems of domination which are trying to kill us, they never quite become us. They are, as Cedric J Robinson used to say, only one condition of our existence or being. Running away, living apart, squatting, communing, feral trading, bartering, self-managed currencies, human, debt, labour, knowledge strikes, boycott, divestment, non-policing, throwing your shoe at an occupying president: the ways of non-participation in the given order of things are many, varied and hard to summarize. And they are taken up for a variety of reasons, including the failure or irrelevance of states and the US–European post–World War II social movement model.”

July 7th, 2020, Tom
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