HaFI Presents #01: NIEMANNS ZEIT – EIN DEUTSCHER HEIMATFILM, dir. Marion Schmid/Horst Kurnitzky, (FRG 1985), September 11, 2019, Arsenal Cinema

The Public Screening, which we have organized for over two years in the Arsenal Cinema, is now being continued with a curated program. This time the Harun Farocki Institut has given “carte blanche” to the film maker and former colleague of Farocki, Stefan Pethke.

NIEMANNS ZEIT – EIN DEUTSCHER HEIMATFILM (Marion Schmid, Horst Kurnitzky) an essay film made in West Berlin screened out of competition at the Berlinale of 1985. A lonely academic played by Gerd Wameling, who was part of Peter Stein’s Schaubühne ensemble at the time, carries out research into the images and texts of National Socialism. A sparse mise-en-scène. Documentary sequences. And right in the middle, a formal island of black-and-white in which three men – a biologist, the philosopher of religion Klaus Heinrich and the most famous mountaineer in the world – are confronted with their very different respective notions of nature.
Marion Schmid, a co-publisher of Carl Einstein’s writings, and Horst Kuznitsky, the author of Triebstruktur des Geldes knew Farocki from Heinrich’s lectures at the FU, which were open to all and attracted a wide spectrum of curious attendees.

In the presence of Marion Schmid and Horst Kurnitzky
Moderation: Stefan Pethke

Niemanns Zeit – Ein deutscher Heimatfilm
Marion Schmid and Horst Kurnitzky FRG 1985

With Gerd Wameling, Reinhold Messner, Klaus Heinrich
35 mm OV/EnS 113 min

The Harun Farocki Institut Presents
Wed, 11.09.2019, 7.00pm, Cinema 1

Location: Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst e.V.
Potsdamer Strasse 2, 10785 Berlin
Tickets: 8 Euros / 5 Euros (Members) / 3 Euros (Children/Berlin-Pass)

September 2nd, 2019, Event / Projects
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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