Public Screening #10: Le Charbonnier/El-Faham: Mohamed Bouamari, November 1, 2018, Arsenal

For this edition we have invited the third Harun Farocki residency scholarship holder, Ali Hussein Al Adawy. For the viewing Al Adawy has selected the film LE CHARBONNIER/EL-FAHAM (1972) by Mohamed Bouamari from the Arsenal archive.

“Belkacem, a former resistance fighter for the ALN (Armée de Libération Nationale, the military arm of the National Front for Algerian Independence), works as a charcoal burner and lives out a daily battle with nature. He transforms wood into coal and tries to sell it at the big village markets so that he, his family, his wife and two children, can survive. After gas is introduced as a source of energy, he loses his job and flees to the capital in search of work. When these attempts fail, he returns to his village defeated and finds his wife has switched sides: dreaming of independence, she has now started to work in the textile factory.” (Ali Hussein Al Adawy)
The print seems to be in bad shape, but we will give it a try. (HaFI)

Le Charbonnier/El-Faham
Mohamed Bouamari, ALG, 1972
Production: ONCIC (Algeria)
35 mm, 99 min, OV with German subtitles

Thursday November 1, 2018
7.30 p.m.

Cinema Arsenal 2
Potsdamer Strasse 2
10785 Berlin
Free admission

Screening with Ali Hussein Al Adawy

October 25th, 2018, Event / Projects
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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