Filmkritik, Issue 335/336, Nov/Dec 1984

In October 1984, Arno Luik conducted an extensive interview with the American documentary filmmaker Emile de Antonio. “Dee” revisits the beginnings of the New American Cinema and Jonas Mekas, the New York art scene around John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg and others, his own films like IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG, PAINTERS PAINTING, and UNDERGROUND. He also remembers dubious business deals involving nylon ropes and face masks of the US Army.

The resulting 40-page monologue was meant to be an integral part of the issue 335/336 of the German film journal Filmkritik, conceived by Jürgen Ebert. The galley proofs were already finished, but the money to pay the printer was lacking. Filmkritik ceased existing.

The previously unpublished issue will be released during the “Edit Film Culture!” festival. It will also be available in book stores and directly via Brinkmann & Bose.

More information on our contribution with Edit Film Culture! here.

 

* The publication Filmkritik Nr. 335–336, Nov.-Dez. 1984 is realised within the framework of Edit Film Culture!, a project by silent green Film Feld Forschung gGmbH in cooperation with Jonas Mekas/Anthology Film Archives, Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst e. V., SAVVY Contemporary e.V., Harun Farocki Institut, Spector Books and Lithuanian Culture Institute. Funded by Hauptstadtkulturfonds.

June 30th, 2018, Projects / Publication
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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