Public Screening #07: Robina Rose: Nightshift, May 30, 2018, Arsenal

At the occasion of the Public Screening held at the Cinema Arsenal, we will present two films NIGHTSHIFT (1981, GB) by Robina Rose and LARISSA (1980, USSR) by Elem Klimov, both film copies are located at the Arsenal archive.

NIGHTSHIFT (1981) by Robina Rose (in collaboration with Nicola Lane) was shot as a low budget film over five nights at the Portobello Hotel in west London, where the filmmakers regularly worked to make ends meet. It was created in parallel to other important projects by British filmmakers of the 70s and early 80s, which explored the work of women in relation to politics, film, desire, and society. Today, the film is largely unknown, although the info-sheet for the 12th International Forum of New Cinema states that it was the “best British film of this edition” of the Edinburgh Film Festival; with filmmaker Jon Jost on the camera, it also entered the American independent film scene. We are showing NIGHTSHIFT together with LARISSA (1980) by Elem Klimov, a cinematic tribute to Larissa Sheptiko, one of the most significant Soviet film directors.

Nightshift
Robina Rose Great Britain 1981
16 mm, OV/GeS, 67 min

Larissa
Elem Klimov USSR 1980
35mm, OV/GeS, 20 min

Wednesday, May 30, 2018
7 p.m.
Kino Arsenal 2
Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst e.V.
Potsdamerstr 2
10785 Berlin

May 25th, 2018, Event / Projects
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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