Public Screening #06: Skip Norman: selection of films, March 22, 2018, Arsenal


Skip Norman, Helke Sander and Harun Farocki in BRECHT DIE MACHT DER MANIPULATEURE (1967/68) from Helke Sander

Thursday, March 22, 2018
7 p.m.
Arsenal, Cinema 2

Skip Norman, who was born in Baltimore in 1933 and died in Washington DC in 2015, was a student at the German Film and Television Academy Berlin (DFFB) in 1966, the first year of its existence. He went on to become a director and worked on 27 dffb productions. The titles of his films all hint at the struggle to assert an Afro-American identity in a world shaped by whites. CULTURAL NATIONALISM (1969), BLACK MAN’S VOLUNTEER ARMY OF LIBERATION(1970) or STRANGE FRUIT(1970) named after the song by Billie Holiday. BLUES PEOPLE (1968) adapted parts of the play “Dutchman” by his peer LeRoi Jones (who later became Amiri Baraka). “They say, ‘I love Bessie Smith’ and don’t even understand that Bessie Smith is saying, ‘Kiss my ass, kiss my black unruly ass.’” We will be screening five of his short films from the archives of the Arsenal Cinema and the Deutsche Kinemathek.

Blues People FRG 1968
16 mm English OV 18 min

Cultural Nationalism FRG 1969
16 mm English OV 11 min

Black Man’s Volunteer Army of Liberation USA 1970
16 mm English OV 43 min

Strange Fruit USA 1970
16 mm English OV 29 min

Washington D.C. November 1970 USA 1970
16 mm English OV 18 min

March 15th, 2018, Event / Projects
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
moreless news