HaFI 004: Gerhard Benedikt Friedl: An Approach by Helmut Färber

Helmut Färber, born in 1937, has been dedicating his life to film since the late 1950s: as a film critic (Filmkritik, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Trafic), teacher (HFF München and dffb Berlin), film historian and publisher of unique books (on Mizoguchi, Griffith, Renoir, amongst others), as well as occasional author and director of TV programs (for Westdeutscher Rundfunk/WDR). The impression he left on generations of filmmakers and artists, writers and thinkers is seldom acknowledged but can hardly be overestimated.

In “An Approach by Helmut Färber,” an unpublished text written in 2007, documentary filmmaker Gerhard Friedl (Knittelfeld. A Town without a History, Wolff von Amerongen. Did He Commit Bankruptcy Offences?) describes his experience of Färber’s courses at film school – a method of scrupulous, close analysis at the editing table that also played a crucial role in Harun Farocki’s teaching. Farocki got to know Färber in the 1970s and remained deeply indebted to his thoughts and methods throughout his career.

HaFI 004, translated by Ted Fendt, is published at the occasion of Helmut Färber’s 80th birthday and at a moment when Gerhard Friedl, who died in 2009, would have turned 50.

Available for 4 Euro here.

May 10th, 2017, Projects / Publication
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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