[First] HaFI residency fellow: Kevin B. Lee

Kevin B. Leewill be the first guest of the Harun Farocki residency from the middle of December onwards. Kevin B. Lee(*1975) is one of the most well known and productive protagonists in the field now known as “Videographic Film Studies”, or more generally, the “Video Essay” genre.

Over the last ten years Lee has produced more than 300 short, analytical videos in which film reflects on film, sounds and images comment on, analyse and criticise other sounds and images. Furthermore, he is also one of the few people who knows the history of this form and is familiar with the forerunners of this genre such as Harun Farocki or Helmut Färber. In Interface 2.0. (2012), Lee extends Farocki’s reciprocal reflection on film and video (Schnittstelle / Interface) with the digital interface of Final Cut and considers how word and image relate to each other under the changed conditions.

Since 2013, within the context of two Master programmes at the Art Institute (Chicago), Lee has moved beyond the film-critical framework in the narrow sense to explore a further field. A much respected result of this work is Transformers. The Premake, a 24 minute Internet video which arranges a wealth of material available online (fan videos, Wikipedia entries, Tweets etc.) into a “desktop documentary” which, two weeks before the premiere of Michael Bay’s film, presents a critical production history of the film.
Here, as in his other work, Lee demonstrates – in addition to his technical accomplishment and astounding productivity – a consciousness for the forms of circulation, the economics and politics of every (including his own) image production.

The Harun Farocki residency has been made possible through the financing of the Goethe-Institut.

November 30th, 2016, 2016 / Residency
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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