Tele-nausea: losing the presence

Image technology is built into communication tools on many levels – technical, ideological, diagnostical, etc. Providing visibility and audiovisual exchange amid the “war” against the “invisible enemy” however, organized by a global megastructure conglomerate of old school public television and radio ont the one hand and platform capitalism’s gated, paywall protected uber-architectures of “social” media and “content” delivery services on the other. Everything’s new, but it’s also dead and rotten. As Keller Easterling plainly states, “The smart city maintains the shine of the new, even while it centralizes information in ways that violate privacy, with a network that is primitive and crude.”

The longer the lockdown, the more people become aware of the limits of audiovisual connectivity. For they experience these screen-based provisions increasingly as the opposite of what they claim to be, i.e. as separation. I have been talking to many friends over the past few days who have developed phobic reactions to their own dependence on tele-presence. They regret and criticize the relentless condensation, compression, constriction of reality into (and by) the (handheld, desktop) screen. At any rate, the advantages of Skype and Zoom, of videochats and streamed media content have begun to recede. At least they are being seriously re-evaluated.

A friend was sent the Zoom joke above she had found on Twitter – a re-edited and updated version of Rembrandt’s Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp.

The doctor is now isolated from his students and colleagues, who observe the surgery from a safe (and, arguably, social) distance. Only the corpse, spread out on the table in front of him, shares Tulp’s quarantine. Translating the anatomy lesson into the condition of the tele-lecture appears to work quite smoothly, the entire group of bearded, white, collared men seems in full consent. The altered scene, reminiscent of already established multi-modal robotic tele-presence systems in the health sector and care environments (assistive robotics) thus anticipates its general implementation in a future of universal quarantine and compulsory remote learning. For that very reason Dr. Tulp himself appears oddly redundant.

 

Icon of “Isolation,” from the website of NASA’s Human Research Program section on the “5 Hazards of Human Spaceflight”

Consequentially, rather than the incommunicado detainee, it is the distressed, numbed, info-overdosed solitary astronaut in her/his deserted spaceship, one of the subjects of NASA’s Human Research Program, who is now the running candidate for the role model of post-Corona distancing cultures.

In terms of the theory of the image, however, this is not exactly news. As André Gunthert, a leading French visual culture critic, reminds us in a blog entry on the “triumph of the images,” uploaded today: “We rediscover it every day in our digital exchanges: the image is not presence. Countless pragmatic pixel and numbers separate the experience of face-to-face encounters, which are not or poorly reproduced by the wired tools, from those of audiovisual mediation. I cannot touch or hug my virtual interlocutor. And the mosaic of screens in a videoconference only offers a disembodied and distant emulation of the physical meeting, with its varied levels of communication. But the image is no less irreplaceable when circumstances prevent direct contact. It is precisely this capacity for substitution that one of the first theoreticians of painting, Leon Battista Alberti, points out when he illustrates the powers of the image by evoking the most absolute of separations. ‘Plutarch says that Cassander, one of the captains of Alexander, trembled through all his body because he saw a portrait of his King’ [Plutarch, The Life of Alexander, LXXIV,4] (On Painting, 1435). When Alexander was alive, his portrait was only a copy, necessarily inferior to the model. But in the absence of the living body, the image becomes a remnant of presence. It is the conditions external to the representation that define its value. […] Images are not transparent vectors of information, and their limits or manipulations must be constantly recalled. But spectacles are only superfluous or redundant if we cannot freely access what they contain. When circumstances take us away from them, we do not hesitate to resort to substitute forms.”

Gunthert adds for consideration that there is “a good chance that the large-scale experimentation with telepresence, which has long met with much resistance, will encourage its lasting adoption. The repetition of epidemic episodes, the resulting hygiene pressure, not to mention the rise in ecological awareness, are combining to reduce traffic and reduce opportunities for gatherings. Telepresence applications are therefore destined to become established in a society whose codes will be profoundly transformed.” Such transformation of societal codes certainly is taking place right now. Only the extent to which it will gain (and maintain) a foothold that remains to be seen. Recent research on Communication in the Era of Attention Scarcity may well come in handy here. TH

 

 

April 3rd, 2020, 02 / Rosa Mercedes
Interface

Paul B. Preciado on Indigenous models for “stopping the world,” via Artforum: “Every culture has invented procedures for isolation, for fasting, for breaking the rhythms of eating, sexual activity, and production. Those caesuras serve as techniques for modifying subjectivity, activating a process that disrupts perception and feeling and can ultimately generate a transformation, a new way of becoming. Certain languages of Indigenous shamanism call this process ‘stopping the world.’ And that is literally what happened during the Covid-19 crisis. The capitalist mode briefly stopped. […] we could say (drawing on the Brazilian anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro’s analysis of Tupi rituals and shamanic practices) that they usually include at least three stages. In the first, the subject is confronted with their mortality; in the second, they see their position in the trophic chain and perceive the energetic connections that unite all living things; in the final stage, they radically modify their desire, which will perhaps allow them to transform, to become someone else.”

July 26th, 2020, Tom

On the occasion of the film festival “Reconstructing Realities,” the Broadway Cinematheque in Hong Kong will show the film “How to live in FRG” (1990) from Harun Farocki.
The screening will take place on Saturday, July 11, 2:30 pm (local time) at the Goethe Institut Hong Kong.
Online booklet: https://bit.ly/bcXForum50

Reconstructing Realities – A Film Programme to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Berlinale Forum

The screening will be followed by the talk “Harun Farocki’s Imitations of Life” with Doreen Mende, co-founder of the Harun Farocki Institut.
Time: Jul 11, 2020 04:00 pm Hong Kong SAR / 10:00 am Berlin time
Language: English

The talk will be held on Zoom, registration here: https://forms.gle/tyLfKLwBYNUutoLz6
After registration, you will receive an email with the link and the login information to join the talk.

https://www.goethe.de/ins/cn/de/sta/hon/ver.cfm?fuseaction=events.detail&event_id=21884136&

July 8th, 2020, HaFI

Avery F. Gordon, in an interview conducted by Katherine Hite and Daniela Jara in Memory Studies:  “Non-participation is one modality of what I call being in-difference. Being in-difference is a political consciousness and a sensuous knowledge, a standpoint and a mindset for living on better terms than we’re offered, for living as if you had the necessity and the freedom to do so, for living in the acknowledgement that, despite the overwhelming power of all the systems of domination which are trying to kill us, they never quite become us. They are, as Cedric J Robinson used to say, only one condition of our existence or being. Running away, living apart, squatting, communing, feral trading, bartering, self-managed currencies, human, debt, labour, knowledge strikes, boycott, divestment, non-policing, throwing your shoe at an occupying president: the ways of non-participation in the given order of things are many, varied and hard to summarize. And they are taken up for a variety of reasons, including the failure or irrelevance of states and the US–European post–World War II social movement model.”

July 7th, 2020, Tom
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