Public Screening #04: Shinsuke Ogawa: Nippon-koku Furuyashiki-mura, July 11, 2017, Arsenal

July 11, 2017
7 pm
Arsenal, Cinema 2

In the catalogue of the 14th International Forum of New Cinema in 1984, where NIPPON-KOKU FURUYASHIKI-MURA (Shinsuke Ogawa) was screened, a comprehensive production note is printed: “At 2 pm on August 31st, the camera captures the rice flowering in the field…. There is no sign that a rush of cold air masses is already on its way. One month later though, the camera shows that the not a single one of the rice flowers has turned into actual rice. […] As a result, Yoshio and the Ogawa production company formed a team and started experimenting with cold air”. The films of Shinsuke Ogawa connect political commitment with a thirst for research and stamina, whether on the side of the Japanese student movement, when opposing the construction of the Narita International Airport or finally, as is the case here, in this precise, emphatic observation of rural life.

Nippon-koku Furuyashiki-mura
Shinsuke Ogawa
Japan 1983
16 mm OmU 210 min

June 26th, 2017, Event / Projects
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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