Presentation: Kevin B. Lee and Chloé Galibert-Laîné, February 6, 2017, FU Berlin

In Process – In Progress #02
Monday, 6 February 2017 at 7:30 PM
free admission

The Bottled Songs of Lost Children

Formulating a poetic framework to explore the contemporary landscape of media and terror
Auditorium of the Seminar for Film Studies FU Berlin

Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz

– So how do we present this project? Usually these kinds of descriptions try to reassure the audience that they are in the presence of experts so that their time and attention won’t be wasted. – And we are indeed no experts on the questions of terrorism… then our presentation should be precisely about the process of producing expertise on that topic, while resisting the rhetoric of authority. – Yes, and it should also dramatize the ongoing question of how we situate and portray ourselves in the midst of our subject matter. – … and how we define our roles in relation to our audiences. – So why don’t we perform a re-enactment of our nine months online conversation? Thus we could give the audience a sense of how the project evolved, as we tried to get our bearings in the wild field of terrorist media. – And how we tried to find what… don’t know how to phrase it, but in French we have this very nice expression that literally means “it looks at me”, but actually means “it’s my business” or “it concerns/affects me”. – So then I would say: how we tried to find, among this overwhelming audiovisual material, what was looking at us.

Chloé Galibert-Laîné is a French filmmaker and researcher. She is currently enrolled in the ‘research and creation’ PhD program SACRe at the École normale supérieure de Paris. She directed an award-winning short fiction film and produced several video-essays for Fandor. Her current academic and video work focuses on film reception, film memories, found footage and remix practices.

Kevin B. Leeis one of the most well known and productive protagonists in the field now known as “Videographic Film Studies,” or more generally, the “Video Essay” genre. Over the last ten years Lee has produced more than 300 short, analytical videos in which film reflects on film, sounds and images comment on, analyse and criticise other sounds and images. His “Transformers. The Premake” (2014) was screened widely on international film festivals. He is currently staying in Berlin for the first Residency of the Harun Farocki Institut.

IN PROCESS – IN PROGRESS presents exchanges about ongoing projects between cinema and contemporary art. Two collaborating artists/filmmakers show footage and material, develop thoughts, perform their working process: Practice as theory; theory as practice.

Concept / Contact: Prof. Dr. Volker Pantenburg
Seminar für Filmwissenschaft Institut für Theaterwissenschaft
Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz
volker.pantenburg@fu-berliln.de

January 31st, 2017, 2016 / Residency
Interface

Sara Ahmed on the perfomativity of disgust (from The Cultural Politics of Emotion, 2004): “To name something as disgusting is to transfer the stickiness of the word ‘disgust’ to an object, which henceforth becomes generated as the very thing that is spoken. The relationship between the stickiness of the sign and the stickiness of the object is crucial to the performativity of disgust as well as the apparent resistance of disgust reactions to ‘newness’ in terms of the generation of different kinds of objects. The object that is generated as a disgusting (bad) object through the speech act comes to stick. It becomes sticky and acquires a fetish quality, which then engenders its own effects.”

November 7th, 2020, Tom

David Graeber (1961-2020) on What Would It Take (from his The Democracy Project. A History, a Crisis, a Movement, 2013, p. 193): “We have little idea what sort of organizations, or for that matter, technologies, would emerge if free people were unfettered to use their imagination to actually solve collective problems rather than to make them worse. But the primary question is: how do we even get there? What would it take to allow our political and economic systems to become a mode of collective problem solving rather than, as they are now, a mode of collective war?”

September 7th, 2020, Tom

T.J. Demos on why cultural practitioners should never surrender, via tranzit.sk:  “For artists, writers, and curators, as art historians and teachers, the meaning-production of an artwork is never finished, never fully appropriated and coopted, in my view, and we should never surrender it; the battle over significance is ongoing. We see that battle rise up in relation to racist and colonial monuments these days in the US, the UK, and South Africa. While the destruction of such monuments results from and is enabling of radical politics, it’s still not enough until the larger institutions that support and maintain their existence as well as the continuation of the politics they represent are also torn down. This is urgent as well in the cultural sphere, including the arts institutions, universities, art markets, discursive sphere of magazines and journals, all in thrall to neoliberalism, where we must recognize that it’s ultimately inadequate to simply inject critical or radical content into these frameworks, which we know excel at incorporating those anti-extractivist expressions into further forms of cultural capital and wealth accumulation. What’s required is more of the building of nonprofit and community-based institutions, organizing radical political horizons and solidarity between social formations.”

August 21st, 2020, Tom
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