Presentation: Kevin B. Lee and Chloé Galibert-Laîné, February 6, 2017, FU Berlin

In Process – In Progress #02
Monday, 6 February 2017 at 7:30 PM
free admission

The Bottled Songs of Lost Children

Formulating a poetic framework to explore the contemporary landscape of media and terror
Auditorium of the Seminar for Film Studies FU Berlin

Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz

– So how do we present this project? Usually these kinds of descriptions try to reassure the audience that they are in the presence of experts so that their time and attention won’t be wasted. – And we are indeed no experts on the questions of terrorism… then our presentation should be precisely about the process of producing expertise on that topic, while resisting the rhetoric of authority. – Yes, and it should also dramatize the ongoing question of how we situate and portray ourselves in the midst of our subject matter. – … and how we define our roles in relation to our audiences. – So why don’t we perform a re-enactment of our nine months online conversation? Thus we could give the audience a sense of how the project evolved, as we tried to get our bearings in the wild field of terrorist media. – And how we tried to find what… don’t know how to phrase it, but in French we have this very nice expression that literally means “it looks at me”, but actually means “it’s my business” or “it concerns/affects me”. – So then I would say: how we tried to find, among this overwhelming audiovisual material, what was looking at us.

Chloé Galibert-Laîné is a French filmmaker and researcher. She is currently enrolled in the ‘research and creation’ PhD program SACRe at the École normale supérieure de Paris. She directed an award-winning short fiction film and produced several video-essays for Fandor. Her current academic and video work focuses on film reception, film memories, found footage and remix practices.

Kevin B. Leeis one of the most well known and productive protagonists in the field now known as “Videographic Film Studies,” or more generally, the “Video Essay” genre. Over the last ten years Lee has produced more than 300 short, analytical videos in which film reflects on film, sounds and images comment on, analyse and criticise other sounds and images. His “Transformers. The Premake” (2014) was screened widely on international film festivals. He is currently staying in Berlin for the first Residency of the Harun Farocki Institut.

IN PROCESS – IN PROGRESS presents exchanges about ongoing projects between cinema and contemporary art. Two collaborating artists/filmmakers show footage and material, develop thoughts, perform their working process: Practice as theory; theory as practice.

Concept / Contact: Prof. Dr. Volker Pantenburg
Seminar für Filmwissenschaft Institut für Theaterwissenschaft
Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz
volker.pantenburg@fu-berliln.de

January 31st, 2017, 2016 / Residency
Interface

On the occasion of the film festival “Reconstructing Realities,” the Broadway Cinematheque in Hong Kong will show the film “How to live in FRG” (1990) from Harun Farocki.
The screening will take place on Saturday, July 11, 2:30 pm (local time) at the Goethe Institut Hong Kong.

Reconstructing Realities – A Film Programme to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Berlinale Forum

The screening will be followed with a talk with Doreen Mende from the Harun Farocki Institut.
The talk will be public via Zoom. A link will follow shortly.

https://www.goethe.de/ins/cn/de/sta/hon/ver.cfm?fuseaction=events.detail&event_id=21884136&

July 8th, 2020, HaFI

Avery F. Gordon, in an interview conducted by Katherine Hite and Daniela Jara in Memory Studies:  “Non-participation is one modality of what I call being in-difference. Being in-difference is a political consciousness and a sensuous knowledge, a standpoint and a mindset for living on better terms than we’re offered, for living as if you had the necessity and the freedom to do so, for living in the acknowledgement that, despite the overwhelming power of all the systems of domination which are trying to kill us, they never quite become us. They are, as Cedric J Robinson used to say, only one condition of our existence or being. Running away, living apart, squatting, communing, feral trading, bartering, self-managed currencies, human, debt, labour, knowledge strikes, boycott, divestment, non-policing, throwing your shoe at an occupying president: the ways of non-participation in the given order of things are many, varied and hard to summarize. And they are taken up for a variety of reasons, including the failure or irrelevance of states and the US–European post–World War II social movement model.”

July 7th, 2020, Tom

Denise Ferreira da Silva via Canadian Art: “Visuality or rather visualizability—being available via social media and accessible through electronic gadgets—seems to have become the main (if not the sole) criterion for reality, which becomes crucial for the ethical-political demands for the protection of black lives, for state accountability and for justice. If that is so, the only way is through these conditions of representation. I mean, the creative move first takes the visualizable as it is, that is, as a twice removed re/composition (at the same time a live streaming, news reporting and documenting) of the scene of violence which only tells us that it happens. It exposes the excess that is the state’s use of total violence, of law enforcement as technique of racial subjugation, while simultaneously removing the black person (the father, the sister, the friend) out of the scene of violence and its visualization. It does so by restoring the dimensions of their existence that the camera cannot capture. That is, the creative move must protect (as an ethical gesture) the black person (keeping her obscurity) in the excess that is the very visualization of the scene of total violence.”

June 28th, 2020, Tom
moreless news