Presentation: Kevin B. Lee and Chloé Galibert-Laîné, February 6, 2017, FU Berlin

In Process – In Progress #02
Monday, 6 February 2017 at 7:30 PM
free admission

The Bottled Songs of Lost Children

Formulating a poetic framework to explore the contemporary landscape of media and terror
Auditorium of the Seminar for Film Studies FU Berlin

Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz

– So how do we present this project? Usually these kinds of descriptions try to reassure the audience that they are in the presence of experts so that their time and attention won’t be wasted. – And we are indeed no experts on the questions of terrorism… then our presentation should be precisely about the process of producing expertise on that topic, while resisting the rhetoric of authority. – Yes, and it should also dramatize the ongoing question of how we situate and portray ourselves in the midst of our subject matter. – … and how we define our roles in relation to our audiences. – So why don’t we perform a re-enactment of our nine months online conversation? Thus we could give the audience a sense of how the project evolved, as we tried to get our bearings in the wild field of terrorist media. – And how we tried to find what… don’t know how to phrase it, but in French we have this very nice expression that literally means “it looks at me”, but actually means “it’s my business” or “it concerns/affects me”. – So then I would say: how we tried to find, among this overwhelming audiovisual material, what was looking at us.

Chloé Galibert-Laîné is a French filmmaker and researcher. She is currently enrolled in the ‘research and creation’ PhD program SACRe at the École normale supérieure de Paris. She directed an award-winning short fiction film and produced several video-essays for Fandor. Her current academic and video work focuses on film reception, film memories, found footage and remix practices.

Kevin B. Leeis one of the most well known and productive protagonists in the field now known as “Videographic Film Studies,” or more generally, the “Video Essay” genre. Over the last ten years Lee has produced more than 300 short, analytical videos in which film reflects on film, sounds and images comment on, analyse and criticise other sounds and images. His “Transformers. The Premake” (2014) was screened widely on international film festivals. He is currently staying in Berlin for the first Residency of the Harun Farocki Institut.

IN PROCESS – IN PROGRESS presents exchanges about ongoing projects between cinema and contemporary art. Two collaborating artists/filmmakers show footage and material, develop thoughts, perform their working process: Practice as theory; theory as practice.

Concept / Contact: Prof. Dr. Volker Pantenburg
Seminar für Filmwissenschaft Institut für Theaterwissenschaft
Grunewaldstraße 35
12165 Berlin-Steglitz
volker.pantenburg@fu-berliln.de

January 31st, 2017 — Residency / 2016
Interface

On Friday, April 6, 2021, at 8 p.m., Akademie Schloss Solitude will host a Zoom event with former HaFI Residency fellowship holder Shirin Barghnavard about her film “Invisible” (2017). Moderated by Doreen Mende. To register, click here.

April 14th, 2021

The magazine MONOPOL currently features an interview (in German) with Shirin Barghnavard about her film “Invisible,” which she conceived and shot during her HaFI residency in 2017.

April 14th, 2021

via Hyperallergic on the environmental impact of blockchain referring to recent NFT (non-fungible token) art sales: “This is not the first time the art world has come under scrutiny for being on the wrong side of the climate conversation. Artists and activists have protested everything from the carbon footprint of physical art fairs to the fossil fuel money funding major museums. But some say the energy consumption of cryptocurrencies is particularly egregious, and research shows it’s relatively easily quantifiable. A study by Cambridge University, for instance, estimates that bitcoin uses more electricity per year than the entire nation of Argentina. (Ethereum mining consumes a quarter to half of what Bitcoin mining does, but one transaction uses more power than an average US household in a day, according to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.)”

 

Nicholas Mirzoeff on “Artificial vision, white space and racial surveillance capitalism”: “Based as it is on ‘epidermalization’ (the assertion of absolute difference based on relative differences in skin color), AI’s racial surveillance deploys an all-too-familiar racialized way of seeing operating at plan-etary scale. It is the plantation future we are now living in. All such operations take place in and via the new imagined white space of technology known as the cloud. In reality, a very material arrangement of servers and cables, the cloud is both an engine of high-return low-employment capitalism and one of the prime drivers of carbon emissions.”

 

Sara Ahmed on the performativity of disgust (from The Cultural Politics of Emotion, 2004): “To name something as disgusting is to transfer the stickiness of the word ‘disgust’ to an object, which henceforth becomes generated as the very thing that is spoken. The relationship between the stickiness of the sign and the stickiness of the object is crucial to the performativity of disgust as well as the apparent resistance of disgust reactions to ‘newness’ in terms of the generation of different kinds of objects. The object that is generated as a disgusting (bad) object through the speech act comes to stick. It becomes sticky and acquires a fetish quality, which then engenders its own effects.”

November 7th, 2020
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