Report on the “light-typing lecture” by Kevin B. Lee, January 14, 2017, silent green

The “light-typing lecture” by HaFI resident Kevin B. Leeat silent green’s Kuppelhalle in Berlin-Wedding introduced a large and attentive audience to the biographical, methodological, theoretical and legal predicaments of a video essayist’s practice in times of increasing pressure of commercializing and streamlining the video essay’s approach to cinema. A brilliant (and moving) lesson of how to navigate a post-cinema small screen reality where watching films has become a multitask, short attention span, data-mined occupation of dealing with the massive availability of parergonal information and the vertiginious referential depths of the internet while at the same time trying to adapt to continuously changing platforms and demands (and sometimes refusing to be adaptive). Kevin’s performative lecture, in which he didn’t speak himself but rather typed away for everyone to see, letting his work speak for him, made tangible the joys and the pressures provided by the desktop as a laboratory and studio environment. Kevin also shared with us the most recent, disillusioning experience with his long-time employer, the film website Fandor, that overnight took down almost 200 of his video essays, for dubious “copyright” reasons. The work of years – vanished from sight (though some of it, thank god, retrievable at Kevin’s Vimeo presence. During the upcoming months, Kevin will investigate the irregular circulation of digital copies and rips of works by Harun Farocki as well as continue (together with Chloé Galibert-Lâiné) research into Daesh’s visual production and its circulation.

Film stills (c) Melina Pafundi

January 16th, 2017, 2016 / Residency
Interface

After all the buzz and clamor caused by the 2019 re-opening of the extended MoMA and the much celebrated rehang of its permanent collection, N+1 publishes a sobering curatorial fantasy (by Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus) on what should have been done instead to come to terms with the “outrageous disconnect between saying and doing at this museum—the brazen hypocrisy and superficial multiculturalism.”

January 8th, 2020, HaFI

You have probably watched Ricky Gervais yesterday’s Golden Globe speech already, or read about it, so this is not exactly news to you. Still, it deserves mentioning and posting, particularly if you haven’t seen it yet, notwithstanding all its shortcomings. If simply for the fact that Gervais here shows a welcome (and rare) structural, dialectic, and pretty pitiless understanding of

a) his own debatable role at the ceremony and in the industry as such;
b) the game-shifting changes in the media industry caused by monopoly digital streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Apple;
c) the necessity to (once again) question the public performance of the political amid the liberal Hollywood establishment;
d) the systemic contradiction between “progressive” media content (“quality TV”) and the outrageously destructive economies and technologies on which this content and its providers gleefully rely;
e) the blatant inconsistency in the actions of the media industry people when it comes to not only complaining about racism but actually fight it;

and much more…

January 6th, 2020, HaFI
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